No injunction to enforce legal professional privilege – High Court’s decision in Glencore highlights the extreme risks of data breach

The High Court has in Glencore v Commissioner of Taxation[1] determined unanimously that legal professional privilege is not a legal right that is enforceable by way of an injunction when confidential documents enter the public domain, even as a result of theft. Privilege remains a fundamental right but it is only an immunity from complying […]

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Doing Business in Australia

The Australian Government welcomes foreign investment. With well-developed infrastructure, a stable political environment, robust economy and easy access to Asia Pacific, Australia is an ideal investment location for foreign companies looking to grow internationally. There are important considerations for foreign investors to make when deciding on how to enter the Australian market. Whether it’s the […]

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Class Action against Local Government

In a class action proceeding against a local government for a claim in debt, the plaintiff made an application to strike out parts of the local government’s defence and counter claim that sought to rely on the principles of ‘change of position’, a defence associated with restitution. The application by the plaintiff was dismissed and […]

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The future of litigation in Queensland – eDiscovery and eTrials

Litigation can be costly. In particular, the discovery stage can form one of the most expensive phases of the litigation process. The Court and practitioners alike are increasingly turning to technological solutions to reduce the time and cost of the discovery process. Taking into account such factors, Gadens were recently involved in a proceeding in […]

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Judicial review – proper, genuine and realistic consideration

A recent Federal Court decision is a timely reminder that Ministers should not rely entirely on briefing notes before making decisions – and when the decision is defended, it is the Minister who is expected to give evidence. The Federal Court recently found that a Minister had failed to “consider any comments, information or documents” […]

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The risks of discontinuing: a look at the High Court’s decision in UBS v Tyne

The recent High Court decision of UBS v Tyne [2018] HCA 45 concerned circumstances where an original trustee of a trust discontinued proceedings in the Supreme Court of New South Wales, then almost 2 years later a subsequently-appointed trustee of the same trust commenced fresh proceedings in the Federal Court raising, in substance, the same claims against […]

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Borrowers punished for behaving unconscionably in taking advantage of a lender’s mistake

The New South Wales Supreme Court decision of Citigroup v Wernhard [2019] NSWSC 132 considers whether certain conduct by the borrowers was unconscionable (as against a lender). Borrowers sold one of three properties that was held as security for loans to them, but the lender mistakenly released mortgages over all three. The borrowers noticed the mistake, subsequently sold […]

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Banks to take extra care with vulnerable customers

The new Banking Code of Practice, which commences on 1 July 2019, requires member banks to train their staff to take extra care with vulnerable customers, by acting with sensitivity, respect and compassion.

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The duty of care of a public authority

A recent Queensland decision[1] raises the important issue as to when a pubic authority, in the exercise of its statutory powers, will owe a common law duty of care to the public. In 2012, a three-year old child was hit and fatally injured in the carpark area of a Hungry Jack’s restaurant complex. The driver […]

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Not all errors are equal

The nature of jurisdictional error has long confounded and confused. Not all errors of law are equal. Some errors deprive decision makers of authority, others do not. Some errors may be reviewed; the review of others may validly be excluded. There is a distinction of principle between errors characterised as jurisdictional errors and errors characterised […]

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When is a decision subject to judicial review?

The Judicial Review Act 1991 (Qld) (JRA) provides an avenue for a person aggrieved by an administrative decision to seek judicial review. However, the right of a person to make an application for review of a decision[1] and the power of the Court to make orders[2] depend on the existence of ‘a decision to which […]

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Two wrongs don’t make a legal right

Equal treatment is a fundamental principle of justice. This is well understood in the abstract, but what it might mean in practice and how it might be enforced is less clear, as is demonstrated by an important recent UK decision[1] that will be monitored closely by Australian lawyers.   The case As a result of […]

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