Federal Court finds ticket reseller engaged in misleading and deceptive conduct

In the recent case of ACCC v Viagogo AG, the Federal Court considered whether Viagogo engaged in misleading and deceptive conduct by acting in a way liable to mislead consumers when reselling event tickets in breach of the Australian Consumer Law. This decision is a reminder to businesses to accurately describe the nature of the products or services […]

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Employees’ priority in the insolvency of a trading trust: the Amerind case in the High Court

In the Amerind case, the High Court has unanimously held that the former staff of an insolvent trustee company have the same rights to priority payments as the employees of an insolvent non-trustee company. In doing so, the Court settled a long-standing debate about the nature of a trustee’s right to indemnify itself from trust property for trust […]

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The future of litigation in Queensland – eDiscovery and eTrials

Litigation can be costly. In particular, the discovery stage can form one of the most expensive phases of the litigation process. The Court and practitioners alike are increasingly turning to technological solutions to reduce the time and cost of the discovery process. Taking into account such factors, Gadens were recently involved in a proceeding in […]

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When will a court impose a trust relationship in commercial agreements such as franchises?

In Re Stay in Bed Milk & Bread Pty Ltd (In Liquidation) ACN 115 166 982 [2019] VSC 181, the Court considered whether monies paid into a marketing fund by franchisees gave rise to a trust relationship.   Background and the parties’ arguments Stay in Bed Milk & Bread Pty Ltd (the Company) was the franchisor of the […]

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eDiscovery and eTrials in the Supreme Court of Queensland

Litigation can be costly. In particular, the discovery stage can form one of the most expensive phases of the litigation process. The Court and practitioners alike are increasingly turning to technological solutions to reduce the time and cost of the discovery process. Taking into account such factors, Gadens were recently involved in a proceeding in […]

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Judicial review – proper, genuine and realistic consideration

A recent Federal Court decision is a timely reminder that Ministers should not rely entirely on briefing notes before making decisions – and when the decision is defended, it is the Minister who is expected to give evidence. The Federal Court recently found that a Minister had failed to “consider any comments, information or documents” […]

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Two for one: The Court may issue two arrest warrants for failure to attend an examination

The appeal of the decision of the Federal Court in the case of Mensink v Parbery [2018] FCAFC 101 examines the governing principles the Court considers when granting: an arrest warrant to secure appearance at an examination; and an order for contempt of court for failing to comply with an order requiring attendance for examination. […]

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Update on unfair preferences and statutory set-off

One of a liquidator’s most powerful tools is the ability to seek to recover unfair preferences from creditors for the purposes of increasing the pool of assets available to creditors generally. Proceedings to recover unfair preferences can be costly and it is imperative that a liquidator assess not only the evidence available to prove the […]

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Unfair preferences and insolvent transactions – ‘knowledge’ of insolvency and the good faith defence

In Stimpson v Commissioner of State Revenue [2018] QDC 140, the District Court of Queensland considers the statutory defence under the Corporations Act 2001 (the Act) to preference or insolvent transaction proceedings. Underlying the decision is the impact increasingly automated processes may have on well-established legal principles regarding evidence of ‘knowledge’ and ‘belief’. This contributed […]

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Is a new postal rule coming?

On 12 September 2018, the Commonwealth Senate passed the Civil Law and Justice Legislation Amendment Bill 2018 (Cth). This Bill proposes to amend section 160 of the Evidence Act 1995 (Cth).  This section contains the general rule by which a postal article sent by prepaid post is presumed to be received by the recipient on […]

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Ipso facto reforms – what exceptions apply?

From 1 July 2018, new provisions introduced into the Corporations Act 2001 (Cth) (CA 2001) by the Treasury Laws Amendment (2017 Enterprise Incentives No. 2) Act 2017 (Cth), impose a stay on the enforcement of ipso facto clauses against a company that becomes subject to certain prescribed insolvency events. Importantly, the changes only apply to […]

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Ipso Facto Reforms

On 1 July 2018, the Australian Government’s ipso facto reforms (the Reforms) came into effect.[1] Rather than prohibiting the inclusion of ipso facto clauses, the Reforms impose statutory limitations on the enforcement of certain rights found in contracts, agreements or arrangements. It is crucial that government and government agencies understand these Reforms and take them […]

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